When God created man, he made us as more than spirit and thought.  We, as well as the world around us, has material form.  There is design, there is order, and there is beauty.

This is also the way God speaks to us.  He not only speaks to us through story, but he also paints a picture.  From the beginning, the faithful were told to make memorials, build a temple, and take a physical action (such as marching around Jericho) to represent the war in the heavenlies that was in process.

Images have impact.  Regardless of their message, they communicate meaning.  In our culture full of positioned images, it is important to identify the message that is being communicated, whether that be through visual art or film.

This was the focus of one of my very first classes in my apologetics program and it was a very fun way to begin.  In addition to the required text, there was a list of required films to view ranging from The Birds by Hitchcock, to The Last Temptation of Christ by Scorsese, to The Decalogue by Kieślowski.  Two of my reflections from this class were published in the third edition of An Unexpected Journal, one on the deeper meaning in the Pixar short, Lava, and a second on the symbolism of hope found in the Fountain of Trevi.

Apologetic Books on Visual Arts

Beholding the Glory on Amazon
Beholding the Glory: on Amazon

On the Divine Images On Amazon

Visual Faith on Amazon

Visual Faith on Amazon

Saving Leonardo on Amazon

The Way Hollywood Tells It on Amazon

The Way Hollywood Tells It on Amazon

Reel Spirituality on Amazon

Reel Spirituality on Amazon

The Philosophy of Horror on Amazon

The Philosophy of Horror on Amazon

Shows About Nothing on Amazon

 

 

Movies

Part of apologetics is knowing the conversation that are going on in our culture.  In today’s culture, morals and values are not transmitted by religious institutions, but by the shows we watch and the movies we go see.  This class covered not only the technical details of how stories are told, but examined what the underlying message of the storyteller was.  Some of these movies, such as Obvious Child, have no value in and of themselves other than highlighting how our postmodern culture views a certain topic (actually, Obvious Child is the only one on this list that has absolutely no redeeming qualities), others, such as Christopher Nolan’s films that explore the problem of evil from a nihilist perspective, are really discussing the same issues that philosophers have pondered for centuries.

The Birds Movie by Alfred Hitcock
The Birds:  On Amazon
movie rear window
Rear Window: On Amazon
Sullivan's Travels on Amazon
Sullivan’s Travels: On Amazon
dogma movie on Amazon
Dogma On Amazon
Moonrise Kingdom on Amazon
Moonrise Kingdom: On Amazon
Palm Beach on Amazon
Palm Beach: On Amazon
Psycho on Amazon
Psycho: On Amazon
The Royal Tenenbaums
The Royal Tenenbaums: On Amazon
Rushmore on Amazon
Rushmore: On Amazon
The Life Aquatic on Amazon
The Life Aquatic: On Amazon
The Fantastic Mr. Fox
The Fantastic Mr. Fox: On Amazon
Crimes & Misdemeanors on Amazon
Crimes & Misdemeanors: On Amazon
dogma movie on Amazon
Dogma: On Amazon
Shadow & Fog on Amazon
Shadow & Fog: On Amazon
Lars the Real Girl
Lars & the Real Girl: On Amazon
Obvious Child on Amazon
Obvious Child: On Amazon
The Prestige on Amazon
The Prestige: On Amazon
The Dark Knight on Amazon
The Dark Knight: On Amazon
Close Encounters of the Third Kind on Amazon
Close Encounters: On Amazon
Fight Club on Amazon
Fight Club: On Amazon
Children of Men on Amazon
Children of Men: On Amazon
the decalogue on Amazon
The Decalogue: On Amazon
Inception on Amazon
Inception: On Amazon
Stardust memories on Amazon
Stardust Memories:          On Amazon
Tree of Life on Amazon
Tree of Life: On Amazon