As we walked along the beach at low tide at the Siletz Bay, we saw something that we just couldn’t quite place. What seemed like a wave, zipping along the edge of the shore from the sea into the bay.

I hadn’t seen anything like it before. Searching online and asking around, I believe it is a tidal bore. It only occurs in certain locations and even then it only happens at low tides, just as the tide is beginning to turn.

Tidal bores are an interesting phenomenon. The conditions have to be just right for the bore to be triggered. One of the most dramatic occurs at the Quiantang River in China. A festival is held in the fall as people stand on the banks watching a huge wave roll over the current coming in the opposite direction. 1 Keely Lockhart. “Spectacular tidal bore surges up China river.” The Telegraph. Published September 8, 2014. Accessed July 27, 2016. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/11083187/Spectacular-tidal-bore-surges-up-China-river.html
Video of tidal bore on the Quiantang River in China.

Tidal bores occur in relatively few locations worldwide. In fact, for bores to occur, there are a few conditions that has to be met: the river must be shallow, must have a narrow outlet to the sea and a broad funnel-shaped bay. The bay must also have large tidal range – typically more than 6 meters between high and low water. The funnel-like shape not only increases the tidal range, but it can also decrease the duration of the flood tide, down to a point where the flood appears as a sudden increase in the water level. 2Kaushik. “Tidal Bore: When Rivers Flow Against the Current.” Amusing Planet. Published January 22, 2014. Accessed July 26, 2016. http://www.amusingplanet.com/2014/01/tidal-bore-when-rivers-flow-against.html
An explanation of a tidal bore as well as descriptions and photos of bores around the world. The form that they take varies depending on the unique characteristics of each location.

When Dreams and Reality Collide

I had a dream the year before, in part of it my family and I were going up a river so fast that it was almost scary. As fast as this wave going up the shore. As I watched the video again, it reminded me of the dream.

Odd, different things happened during the entire trip. It marked a turning point. What was before was very different than what was after. The dream and coming at just the right time. to see the tidal bore was a sign from God

 

The before and after was very different, but it was just the beginning of the change.

Looking back, the bore tide seemed to be a sign from God that while the fullness wasn’t there yet, the tide had begun to turn. The tidal bore wave is the advance. The main current is still going out, pushing against, but the bore tide goes over and above. The tidal bore is the signal that it is coming.

Some of you may be in the same situation. You’ve been holding on for God’s promises, but have started to get discouraged. Jesus told us to watch for the signs. In Luke 21:28 he said, “when you see these things begin to come to pass, then look up, lift up your head, your redemption draws near.”

He was speaking about the End Times, but it applies to other circumstances as well. We have to pay attention to what God is doing. If He has said He will do something, wait for it. Watch for it. Look for it.

When the promise begins to come, expect the rest to follow.

 

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References   [ + ]

1. Keely Lockhart. “Spectacular tidal bore surges up China river.” The Telegraph. Published September 8, 2014. Accessed July 27, 2016. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/11083187/Spectacular-tidal-bore-surges-up-China-river.html
Video of tidal bore on the Quiantang River in China.
2. Kaushik. “Tidal Bore: When Rivers Flow Against the Current.” Amusing Planet. Published January 22, 2014. Accessed July 26, 2016. http://www.amusingplanet.com/2014/01/tidal-bore-when-rivers-flow-against.html
An explanation of a tidal bore as well as descriptions and photos of bores around the world. The form that they take varies depending on the unique characteristics of each location.